Blown Eggshells for Crafts and Display

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These blown eggshells will be available for purchase after Jan 6th, 2015

FincheggIDFinch Egg:   $4.00

Finch, 10/16ths of an inch tall, light beige or white or greenish, semi-transparent. They look like jelly beans. Very fragile, very thin shell, blown with two tiny holes, top and bottom. So adorable we put up with their fragile attitude.

DoveggIDDove Egg:  $4.00

The Diamond Dove lays an egg that is smaller than Button Quail, but bigger than finch. About the size of my thumbnail, it is a darling little egg. Quite sturdy, while still being a fragile real blown egg. All white, with a porous shell, not shiny.

BobwhiteeggIDBobwhite Quail Egg:  $3.00

Bobwhite Quail, white, @ 1.25 inches tall, 3.5 inches around the tallest circumference, 3 inches around the fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole. Porous white surface, often textured by natural white on white details.

PharoaheggIDCoturnix Quail Egg: $3.00

Coturnix Quail, dark brown blotches on light brown background – magnificently blotchy, @ 1.25 inches tall, 3.5 inches around the tallest circumference, 3 inches around the fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole. Sometimes has a natural chalky finish.

ValleyQuaileggIDValley Quail Egg:  $4.00

Valley Quail, light beige with lots of brown spots @ 1.25 inches tall, 3.5 inches around the tallest circumference, 3 inches around the fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole. It is a delightfully elegant little egg, just beautiful. Limited supply..

 

PigeoneggIDPigeon Egg: $4.00

The pigeon egg is a perfect oval, and has a shiny white finish that almost looks as if it was already decorated!  But that is the natural coating, very small pores, shiny, uniform white… it’s a lovely oval shaped egg. Smaller than bantam chicken, smaller than chukar, larger than quail. 1.5 inches tall, and there is no fat end or pointy end, it is truly oval. If you take a string around the middle, it stretches out 4 inches on the ruler. 4.5 inches if the string goes end to end over the single hole on the longest dimension.

ChukareggIDChukar Partridge Egg:  $3.00

This is a very pretty egg, beige with dark tan speckles. The shell is thin, but not as brittle as a chicken egg. It is smaller than a chicken egg, measuring @1.25 inches tall, 4.5 inches around tallest circumference, 4 inches around fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole. Chukar Partridge are originally from India, and were brought to the USA as game birds. There are wild populations in the US now… but I raise them domestically. Not that they are domestic, one could lose a hand collecting the eggs actually.

BantameggIDBantam Chicken Egg:  $2.75

These bantam chicken eggs are a light terra cotta brown, smooth finish and very oval shape. One hole, as the other eggs, on the fat bottom.

Bantam Chicken, @ 1.75 inches tall, 5 inches around the longest dimension, 4.5 inches around the fattest dimension, 1.25 inches tall, brittle and porous.

PheasanteggIDPheasant Egg: $3.00

Ringneck Pheasant, military green and lighter, @ 2 inches tall, 5.5 inches around tallest circumference, 4.75 inches around fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole, naturally smooth surface, not as porous as the other eggs. Egg color ranges from a deep khaki green to a light green, almost blue, and most are shiny while some can be more of a natural matte finish.

GuineaHenIDGuinea Fowl Egg:  $4.00

(hole top and bottom… !)  The Guinea Hen, also known as Guinea Fowl, lays a remarkably wonderful egg. Cartoonishly egg-shaped, it has a wide base and pointy top. The shell is crazy thick. Each of these is drilled bottom and top, and are from backyard farmers who care for their birds the same way I did. The surface is mottled dottled dotty cream, with patches and bare spots – that is natural. It is possible, but rare, to find a Guinea Hen egg that is perfectly uniformly spotty.

Smaller than a chicken egg, it is just under two inches tall, hole on top and bottom, you will be able to see the hole on the tip of the egg – this is different from my other eggs which are single hole. I don’t have any single hole guinea hen eggs at this time.

5.5 inches if you put a string around the fattest part, 6 inches from tip, round the bottom and back to tip.This is one of the coolest eggs, of my favorites.

BrownChickenEggsIDBrown Chicken Egg:  $2.75

Rich brown to creamy light brown to terra cotta, these are Cuckoo Maran chicken eggs – (but I don’t have any of the dark chocolate brown eggs the Cuckoo Maran is famous for.) But the rich brown are delightful and they range in brown tints. Some have darker spots, some are smooth brown, all are lovely. The range of brown to light is pictured with the two pictures… @ 2.25 inches tall, 6.25 inches around tallest circumference, 5.5 inches around fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole.

RoueneggIDGreen Duck Egg:  $3.00

These blown duck eggs are a natural pastel blueish green. I call them green duck eggs, other people call them blue duck eggs. They are Rouen or Mallard duck eggs. They range in size from bigger than a chicken egg to a little smaller. The natural finish of the egg as it arrives to you is a little grubby. This grubby finish is critical to dye uptake, and is easily removed using the Magic Eraser, (which really is magic). So many buyers right now using dye that I’ve stopped polishing off the finish. These eggs have a mixed reputation for psyanky, some artists find they take the dye well enough and like the effect, others have a hard time getting them to absorb dye – and since it’s not a white egg, feel the colors are duller. Regardless, these are way cool eggs, @ 2.5 inches tall, 6.5 inches around tallest circumference, 6 inches around fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole.

PekinDuckeggIDWhite Duck Egg:  $3.00

White Duck Eggs, @ 2.75 inches tall, 7.5 inches around tallest circumference, 6.5 inches around fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole. Waxy smooth surface, thinner than a goose egg and more flexible than a chicken egg. These eggs may have a mucky looking surface finish when not polished which is the natural membrane and is critical to taking up the dye when the egg is being decorated for psyanky. You can polish off that finish using Magic Eraser (which really is magic!)… so many of you are using dye this season that I’ve stopped polishing them in advance – just so you know. Without the natural surface coating, they are a natural brilliant white. Happy Egging!

Eggs ship within 2 business days of ordering. Orders placed by March 30th should arrive in time for Easter Sunday, April 4th, 2010 using priority mail.

Important tip if you are using goose or duck eggs for the Martha Stewart Living egg dying craft project. The goose and duck eggs have a very different surface texture than chicken eggs and will need at least 1/2 cup of vinegar in the dye – and a full cup for dark dye color. I have done the craft myself with these eggs and 1 teaspoon as directed in the magazine is not enough to make them look like the eggs in the pictures. Also, keep the egg moving in the dye by rolling it with your finger tip… this will make an even dye finish because the blown egg floats on top of the dye bath. Each egg has it’s own texture – some are uniform pastel and some are uniquely patterned.

PeacockeggIDPeacock Egg (Peafowl): $4.50

Peacock, (peafowl), beige, @ 2.75 inches tall, 8 inches around the longest dimension, 6.75 inches around the fattest dimension, subtle light beige sometimes with darker small spots, sometimes just an even eggshell cream white. 1/4 inch hole. We don’t raise peacocks but we know a farmer who treats her birds as well as we treat ours. These eggs are larger than a duck egg, shorter than a goose egg, and fatly egg shaped. Their shell is kind of ceramic-ish, lovely! Limited quantity.

GooseeggIDGoose Egg: $3.00

The Goose Eggs are white, @ 3.5 tall, 9 inches around tallest circumference, 7 inches around fattest circumference, 3/16ths inch hole, porous white, thicker shell than a chicken egg.

Important tip if you are using goose or duck eggs for the Martha Stewart Living egg dying craft project. The goose and duck eggs have a very different surface texture than chicken eggs and will need at least 1/2 cup of vinegar in the dye – and a full cup for dark dye color. I have done the craft myself with these eggs and 1 teaspoon as directed in the magazine is not enough to make them look like the eggs in the pictures. Also, keep the egg moving in the dye by rolling it with your finger tip… this will make an even dye finish because the blown egg floats on top of the dye bath. Each egg has it’s own texture – some are uniform pastel and some are uniquely patterned

 

 

 

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